Looking Back: See the Sea Devil !

Looking back at some of the previous events in the Library’s history is as captivating and astounding as hearing about the new and present exploits of the curators. Here we look back at how one dog owner manipulated his pooch’s friendship with an apparent Sea Monster…

In 1956 the Library was informed of a man in Boston claiming to have control of the behaviour of a “Sea Monster”. Not only that but the man in question; one Mr. Birdtooth-Eyecaptain, was charging the public to view it. The Curator sent out to Boston was amazed at the actualities of the information. Arriving at the Boston Lake one Saturday afternoon to find crowds already gathering and forming cues around Mr Birdtooth’s stall.

There the Curator witnessed paying members of the public have the apparent Sea Monsters arms/legs draped around there neck or shoulder or sometimes even a ladies waist. Then pose for a photo. The actions amazed the Curator and library record show how the public’s lack of fear was at crucial levels of denial. When the public intrigue died down for the day, the curator approached the stall and asked Mr Birdtooth-EyeCaptain for a private viewing. (Many claim these events were used as influence in parts of the edited Library documentary, The Elephant Man.) In this private showing it is said Mr. Birdtooth’s dog would bark twice, and then two tentacles would emerge from the lake. The curator immediately recognised these tentacles to be those of the sea monster; Harropoon. Who’s legend of killing sea man around the world has led to many of them carrying a weapon on board their ships known as, the Harpoon.

Harropoon’s being in Boston was a surprise to the Curator and to Library experts to this day, his voluntary interactions with human kind also remain a source of bafflement. Harropoon was taken to the Library where he remains to this day, in captivity.

Aquatic Monster

1956 Harropoon and the dog who was said to control him.

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